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Why Mauritius?


Sandy BeachMauritius has been endowed with a natural gift for business since it was a major trading post for the renowned French "Compagnie des Indes" two centuries ago. Further still, in the years 1600', it was referred to as the Star and Key of the Indian Ocean.

The business community is active and the government is instrumental in making things happen. Today, any foreign investor can settle hassle-free in Mauritius and be operational swiftly, the icing on the cake is that it is one of the world's most generous tax regimes, where personal and corporate tax are harmonised at the rate as low as 15% and where dividends are tax free. Mauritius has also signed a non-double taxation agreements with 33 countries so far and is signatory to a number of Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements.


Interesting facts:

Currency: The currency used in Mauritius is The Mauritian Rupee (MRU).
Port Louis view

Capital City: The capital city of Mauritius is Port Louis; founded by the Governor Bertrand-François Mahé de La Bourdonnais. 
He turned the island into a prosperous French colony and a port of call on the sea journey from Europe to the Far-East round the Cape of Good Hope. He established Port Louis as a naval base and built roads and bridges. Among his other achievements are the building of the Government House, the Line Barracks, and Château de Mon Plaisir at Pamplemousses Botanical Gardens. Nowadays, Labourdonnais" statue stands guard, facing Port Louis harbour.

Language: English is the official language. French, Chinese and Creole are commonly used. Hindi & Bhojpuri are also spoken. Many hotel employees are fluent in German, Italian, Chinese, Portuguese and Spanish. The Mauritian literacy rate hovers around 90%.

Economy: The Mauritian Economy rests on four main pillars: tourism; sugar; textiles and the services sector. Mauritius is currently ranked 20th globally on the ease of doing business scale.

Climate: Mauritius is not far from the tropic of Capricorn. That means that the Sun is longer at its highest point than anywhere else. It is a tropical island surrounded by greenery and beautifully coloured mountain ranges.
In the winter months (May to October) the highest temperatures vary between 20°C and 26°C in the coastal regions. In summer (November to April) it's slightly higher at 26°C to 32°C, and the water temperature of the Indian Ocean can go up to 28°C.

Dodo

History:


Date

Event

9th Century

Arabs discovered Mauritius.

16th Century

The Portuguese visited Mauritius.

1598


The Dutch who were the first to colonise Mauritius, named it after their ruler, Prince Maurice Van Nassau.

Ebony forests were destroyed by overexploitation and the dodo was exterminated. It later became the symbol of endangered animal species and conservation worldwide.

1710

The Dutch left Mauritius.

1715

The French took possession of the island and re-named it 'Île de France'.

1721

Governor Bertrand-François Mahé de La Bourdonnais founded Port Louis, which later became the capital.
He turned the island into a prosperous French colony and a port of call on the sea journey from Europe to the Far-East round the Cape of Good Hope. He established Port Louis as a naval base and built roads and bridges. Among his other achievements are the building of the Government House, the Line Barracks, and Château de Mon Plaisir at Pamplemousses Botanical Gardens. Nowadays, Labourdonnais" statue stands guard, facing Port Louis harbour.

1810

A major naval battle took place in Grand Port on the south-east coast of the island in this year. It was the only naval battle won by Napoleon, and is thus duly engraved on the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. However, three months later, the British launched a surprise attack from the north of the island and the French governor General Charles Decaen surrendered.

1814

The 1814 Treaty of Paris ratified the cession of Mauritius and its dependencies, Rodrigues and Seychelles, to the British. Réunion Island, which was also captured by the British, was returned to France.
The island took its former name of Mauritius, and English became the official language. However, according to the Treaty of Paris, the population was to keep its language, its religion and its laws. This is the reason why French is still widely spoken, despite the fact that the British ruled the island for 158 years.

1835

The British Abolished Slavery.
As the newly freed slaves refused to work in the plantations, indentured labourers were brought in from India. Chinese and Muslim traders were also attracted to these shores – hence the melting pot which now constitutes the population of Mauritius.

1968

Mauritius gained its independence.
Sir Seewosagur Ramgoolam became the first Prime Minister.
Mauritius still forms part of the British Commonwealth and follows the Westminster pattern of Government.

1992

Mauritius became a Republic.